Tag Archives: parenting the parent

Screening for Dementia

Say, you are worried about your mother who seems to not remember what you had just told her.
Perhaps your husband has taken the wrong turn a few times on the way to a favorite restaurant.
Maybe in conversation you have searched for a word to explain something. You know it is there, but it’s just out of reach. 

Is this dementia? Alzheimer’s?  You are familiar with the signs, but how do you know for sure?

Let’s put your own mind at ease, first, by looking at what is considered normal aging and what is abnormal. Distinguishing between normal memory loss and dementia symptoms is not an exact science but there are some clues to look for:

Are memory changes typical aging or symptoms of dementia?
Typical aging: Symptoms of dementia:
You or a loved one complain about memory loss but are able to provide detailed examples of forgetfulness Complain of memory loss only if asked; unable to recall specific instances
Occasionally search for words Frequent word-finding pauses, substitutions
May have to pause to remember directions, but don’t get lost in familiar places Get lost in familiar places and takes excessive time to return home
Remember recent important events; conversations are not impaired Notable decline in memory for recent events and ability to converse
Interpersonal social skills are at the same level as they’ve always been Loss of interest in social activities; may behave in socially inappropriate ways
Adapted from: The American Medical Association

It is reassuring to know that three-fourths of people over 50 report that their memory is not as good as it once was, and of those who complain about memory problems only 10% have Alzheimer’s or dementia.

If you have definite concerns there are a few tests or questionnaires that can be helpful in clarifying whether a person may have dementia.
Be aware that these cannot be used as diagnostic tools except by a professional. If, after administering the tests you see a problem, you should take the test and the person to a doctor who is able to give you some insight and direction.

The Clock Drawing Test

Have the person draw a clock by hand on a large piece of paper.
Have the person draw the face of a clock and put the numbers in the correct positions.
Then have them draw the hands to indicate the time like 3:40 – one hand of the clock on 3 and the other on the 8.

 Scoring:  assign the following points for each part of the drawing
1 point for a closed circle
1 point for properly placed numbers
1 point for including all twelve numbers
1 point for properly placed hands

If the person cannot draw the clock or if it looks abnormal they would fall into the category of “probably” suffering from mild cognitive impairment or dementia. Many people that cannot pass this test might be suffering from some other illness. This is why it is necessary to consult your doctor.

MIni-Cog Test for Dementia and Alzheimer’s

First, name three objects and then ask the person being tested to repeat them back to you (for example, chair, house, apple). If the person cannot repeat the three objects after a few tries (cannot learn them), please consult a physician immediately.
If the person is successful give them another task for about ten minutes or the clock drawing test.
Next, ask the person to repeat the words/objects from the first part of the test.
If the person is unable to repeat any of the words, they might be categorized as mildly cognitively impaired or suffering from dementia.

The Sage Test
This is a more comprehensive test that you can download developed by Wexler Medical Clinic at Ohio State University.  SAGE

MCI/Alzheimer’s Questionnaire QUESTIONNAIRE 

NEXT: The diagnostic tools doctors use.


Defining Dementia

Since my main focus of this blog will be on dementia we first need a clear definition of what it means. According to the New World Dictionary the psychiatric definition is “the loss or impairment of mental powers due to organic causes.” People with dementia have significantly impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships.

When I told people my mother was suffering from Dementia, they often said, “Oh Alzheimer’s.”, however, the two words are not synonymous. Dementia is a term used for a collection of symptoms which are caused by injury or disease to the brain. Alzheimer’s is a disease.

While it is true that the great majority of those with the symptoms of dementia may develop Alzheimers disease, it is only one kind. Other diseases that exhibit its symptoms are vascular dementia, Lewy body dementia, frontotemporal dementia, Hunington’s disease, and Creutzfelt-Jacob disease. Dementia symptoms also can occur in those whose brain has been affected by injury or drugs.

In the beginning my mother had what is called Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) which is early dementia. She had trouble with tasks that required reasoning, and could not remember what was said in conversations. She was able to live independently at first, but gradually her symptoms worsened. It is at this juncture that conflicts occur. Though the family realizes their loved one needs help, the person with dementia is usually not ready to give up his/her independence. And so, the caregiver challenge begins!

Here are some signs common to dementia
Impaired judgement
Faulty reasoning
Inappropriate behavior
Loss of communication skills
Disorientation to time and place
Gait, motor, and balance problems
Hallucinations, paranoia, agitation

Someone with dementia symptoms may
repeatedly ask the same questions
become lost or disoriented in familiar places
be unable to follow directions
be disoriented about the date or time of day
not recognize or be confused about familiar people
have difficulty with routine tasks such as paying the bills
neglect personal safety, hygiene, and nutrition

 According to the US National Institutes of Health:National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke  Although it is commom in very elderly individuals, dementia is not a normal part of the aging process.

 

A Forum on Dementia

 

Welcome to my new, redesigned blog space. Some of you might have followed my original blog about my mother and her journey through dementia. Others of you may have just discovered my site.

Since my mother’s death, and inspired by her, I have been working toward two goals. The first, at the urging of many, I have taken my blog writings and expanded them into a book. My purpose remains the same: to share my mother’s experience in the hope that it will help others. During the course of writing my blog, I spoke with others and received messages from people from all over the United States and even a few from other countries. Universally they had the same reaction “That sounds just like my mother(or whomever). I know what it’s like.” By offering my book on Amazon I hope to reach more people.

My second goal was to learn as much as I could about dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease. Public awareness of dementia has grown by leaps and bounds and medical researchers and other scientists are discovering more about it each day. Though I have gained much knowledge about it, my goal has become never ending.

My purpose for this site is to share some of what I have learned and information I have gathered from my study of dementia. There is a phethora of information out there on the web, and sifting through it all can be daunting. I don’t claim to be a medical professional or psychologist; I will leave the technical explanations up to them. What I will do is refer you to articles or web pages for more in depth knowledge. My plan is to write every two weeks about some aspect about dementia. In addition, I would like to see this web page as a place to share information and serve as a community forum for those whose lives are or have been touched by dementia. I will share names of organizations that are advocates for dementia or Alzheimers, as well as sites to go to for up-to-date information about the disease and help for caregivers. Anyone else who wishes to contribute something that others would find helpful will be encouraged to do so.